The Emmys: O. J. Simpson did it

jimmy-kimmle

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As you may know last weekend, it was the 68th Emmys started great with the host Jimmy Kimmel he kick things off with a montage that goofed on O.J. Simpson, “Veep,” Jeb Bush and Wham!, before he arrived onstage and acknowledged the night’s big favorites, “Game of Thrones” and “The People v. O.J. Simpson.” “If your show doesn’t have a dragon or a white Bronco, go home now,” he said.

Here are the highlights what happened:

Maggie Smith won the Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series Emmy tonight. This is the third time Smith has taken the statue for Downton Abbey, and the fifth time she was nominated for what has become an iconic role. This makes it four Emmys overall for the two-time Oscar winner.

Emmy host Jimmy Kimmel took great pains to point out early in the show, however, that this was Smith’s ninth nomination and the ninth time she is not at the ceremony. Calling her “Downton absent,” he wondered, “What is wrong with us? Why do we keep nominating this woman?” He didn’t let up, ribbing, “Lame Maggie Smith, if you want an Emmy, you better hop on a plane right now and get your Dowager Count-ass over here.” When Smith ultimately did win, Kimmel stepped in, grabbed the trophy and said, “If you want this, it will be in the lost and found.” The next day, she claimed her award.

Game of Thrones got 38 Emmys wins which won for Best Writing, Best Directing and Best Drama on Sunday night, first tying Frasier with 37 wins then taking the title with a total of 38. The series won 12 Emmys in total this year. It includes for Best Visual and Best Stunts during the creative arts awards that was broad cast Saturday before the Emmys.

Game of Thrones” and “Veep” repeated as best drama and comedy at the 68th Primetime Emmy Awards. The twin triumphs had been widely predicted, but other winners were more surprising. Tatiana Maslany, the star of the cult favorite “Orphan Black,” on BBC, was named best actress in a drama. She played multiple characters, on the show she is one incredible actress. These are the characters that she played Sarah Manning / Elizabeth Childs / Alison Hendrix / Cosima Niehaus / Helena / Rachel Duncan / Tony Sawicki / Jennifer Fitzsimmons / Katja Obinger / Pupok (Scorpion, voice) / Krystal Goderitch / Veera Suominen (MK). Incredible actress.

Rami Malek won best actor in a drama for “Mr. Robot,” another highly regarded but scantly watched series – one character, I think.

The comedy acting wins were more predictable. Julia Louis-Dreyfus was named best actress in a comedy, for “Veep,” for the fifth time in a row. In her speech she both mocked Donald J. Trump and honored her father, Gérard Louis-Dreyfus, who died Friday before the Emmys.

Jeffrey Tambor won for the second consecutive year for “Transparent.” He waved off the play-off music to urge Hollywood to give more opportunities to transgender actors. “I would not be unhappy were I the last male to play a female transgender on television,” he said. “We have work to do.”

The night’s other big winner was “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” claiming the award for best limited series, in a crowded category. John Travolta produced it and also won awards for lead actress (Sarah Paulson) and actor (Courtney B. Vance), supporting actor (Sterling K. Brown) and writing (D.V. DeVincentis).

“Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” won best variety talk show, a category that has been dominated for years. Matt Damon humiliated Jimmy Kimmel asking him who won while eating an apple.

Additional surprises came in the comedy supporting acting category. Louis Anderson won for “Baskets,” in which he played a version of his mother, if you haven’t seen it, it’s on FX.  Kate McKinnon won for her performance on “Saturday Night Live.” In her acceptance speech, Ms. McKinnon thanked her cast and crew.

Here are the winners:

Drama Series: “Game of Thrones” (HBO)

Comedy Series: “Veep” (HBO)

Mini-Series or Movie: “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story” (FX)

TV Movie: “Sherlock: The Abominable Bride (Masterpiece)” (PBS)

Variety Talk Series: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver” (HBO)

Variety Sketch Series: “Key & Peele” (Comedy Central)

Actor in a Comedy Series: Jeffrey Tambor, “Transparent”

Actress in a Comedy Series: Julia Louis-Dreyfus, “Veep”

Actor in a Drama Series: Rami Malek, “Mr. Robot”

Actress in a Drama Series: Tatiana Maslany, “Orphan Black”

Actor in a Mini-Series or Movie: Courtney B. Vance, “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story”

Actress in a Mini-Series or Movie: Sarah Paulson, “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story”

Supporting Actor in a Drama: Ben Mendelsohn, “Bloodline”

Supporting Actress in a Drama: Maggie Smith, “Downton Abbey”

Supporting Actor in a Comedy: Louie Anderson, “Baskets”

Supporting Actress in a Comedy: Kate McKinnon, “Saturday Night Live”

Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie: Sterling K. Brown, “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story”

Supporting Actress in a Mini-Series or Movie: Regina King, “American Crime”

*Reality Host: RuPaul Charles, “RuPaul’s Drag Race” (Logo)

Reality Competition Program: “The Voice” (NBC)

Writing for a Comedy Series: Aziz Ansari and Alan Yang, “Master of None” (“Parents”)

Writing for a Drama Series: David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, “Game of Thrones” (“Battle of the Bastards”)

Writing for a Mini-Series or Movie: D.V. DeVincentis, “The People v. O. J. Simpson: American Crime Story” (“Marcia, Marcia, Marcia”)

*Writing for a Variety Series: “Last Week Tonight With John Oliver”

Writing for a Variety Special: Patton Oswalt, “Patton Oswalt: Talking for Clapping”

Directing for a Comedy Series: Jill Soloway, “Transparent” (“Man on the Land”)

Directing for a Drama Series: Miguel Sapochnik, “Game of Thrones” (“Battle of the Bastards”)

Directing for a Mini-Series or Movie: Susanne Bier, “The Night Manager”

*Directing for a Variety Series: Ryan McFaul, “Inside Amy Schumer”

Directing for a Variety Special: Thomas Kail and Alex Rudzinski, “Grease: Live”

*Guest Actor in a Drama Series: Hank Azaria, “Ray Donovan”

*Guest Actress in a Drama Series: Margo Martindale, “The Americans”

*Guest Actor in a Comedy Series: Peter Scolari, “Girls”

*Guest Actress in a Comedy Series: Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, “Saturday Night Live”

*Awards presented during the Creative Arts Emmy ceremony Sept. 10-11.

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Golden Globes Awards 2016

Sunday night was the Golden Globes who won? Your Favorites.

 

Ricky 2

Ricky 1

Here are the Highlights

Stallone narrowly avoided criticism when he initially forgot to thank director Ryan Coogler and Michael B. Jordan in his acceptance speech for the Best Supporting Actor in a Motion Picture award for his role in “Creed”. It’s been 40 years that he was nominated for Golden Globe, but this time he won. Best comeback movie ever made.

Sly Stalone

“I wanna thank Rocky, the best friend I ever had!” he got emotional and wanted to thank his family but forgot to mention the actor and director of the movie.

Jamie-Foxx

Jamie Foxx won in so many ways at the Golden Globes. While presenting the award for Best Original Score, Foxx made fun of Steve Harvey’s “Miss Universe” fail, announcing “Straight Out of Compton” as the winner, which obviously wasn’t nominated (shade).

“I’m sorry Folks. I made a mistake it’s right here on the card. I take full responsibility,” Foxx said in his best Harvey imitation.

In this image released by NBC, Denzel Washington, left, stands with his wife Pauletta, second left, and his family as he accepts the Cecil B. Demille Award at the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 10, 2016. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)
In this image released by NBC, Denzel Washington, left, stands with his wife Pauletta, second left, and his family as he accepts the Cecil B. Demille Award at the 73rd Annual Golden Globe Awards at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills, Calif., on Sunday, Jan. 10, 2016. (Paul Drinkwater/NBC via AP)

Denzel Washington, this year’s recipient of the Cecil B. DeMille Award, kept his remarks short. “I forgot my speech,” he laughed. Then he had trouble reading it. “I need my glasses,” he laughed. “I’m speechless.” He had in his pocket early that evening, but forgot his glasses. He should have memorize it, he is an actor.

Lady Gaga

Okay, I’m going to just sound a little excited on this one: Lady Gaga just won the Golden Globe for best actress in a limited television series for her work in American Horror Story: Hotel. That’s not even the full name of the category (it’s much more convoluted than that), but the fact is that Lady Gaga won for her TV series debut playing a vampiric bloodthirsty character known as The Countess. And there’s a reason she won: she’s been fantastic, fearless, and heartfelt since the very first episode aired.

Taraji P. Henson won “Best Performance by an Actress In A Television Drama” for her role as Cookie on FOX “Empire” beating out Viola Davis, Robin Wright, Caltriona Balfe, and Eva Green. She passed out Cookies to her friends.

“Who knew that playing an ex-convict would take me all around the globe?” Henson said in her acceptance speech. She went on about how she thought it would be another one of her other roles that landed her a golden globe, but “it’s cookie who spent 17 years in jail for selling crack, so the world loves real.”

Henson thanked “Empire” creator Lee Daniels and her co-stars Terrence Howard, Jussie Smollet, Trai Bayers, and Bryshere Gray. And when they sent her the signal to wrap up her speech? She hilariously snapped back, “I’ve waited 20 years for this! You gon wait” – in true Cookie fashion.

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The Winners

Best motion picture, drama

* “The Revenant”

Best motion picture, musical or comedy

* “The Martian”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, drama

* Brie Larson, “Room”

Best performance by an actress in a motion picture, musical or comedy

* Jennifer Lawrence, “Joy”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, drama

* Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a motion picture

* Sylvester Stallone, “Creed”

Best performance by actress in a supporting role in a motion picture

* Kate Winslet, “Steve Jobs”

Best director, motion picture

* Alejandro González, “The Revenant”

Best performance by an actor in a motion picture, musical or comedy

* Matt Damon, “The Martian”

Best screenplay, motion picture

* Aaron Sorkin, “Steve Jobs”

Best original score, motion picture

* Ennio Morricone, “The Hateful Eight”

Best motion picture, animated

* “Inside Out”

Best original song, motion picture

* “Writing’s on the Wall,” “Spectre”

Best motion picture, foreign language

* “Son of Saul”

Best television series, drama

* “Mr. Robot,” USA

Best television series, musical or comedy

* “Mozart in the Jungle,” Amazon Video

Best television limited series or motion picture made for television

* “Wolf Hall,” PBS

Best performance by an actor in a television series, drama

* Jon Hamm, “Mad Men”

Best performance by an actor in a television series, musical or comedy

* Gael García Bernal, “Mozart in the Jungle”

Best performance by an actor in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

 

* Oscar Isaac, “Show Me a Hero”

Best performance by an actor in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

* Christian Slater, “Mr. Robot”

Best performance by an actress in a TV series, drama

* Taraji P. Henson, “Empire”

Best performance by an actress in a supporting role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

* Maura Tierney, “The Affair”

 

Best performance by an actress in a leading role in a series, limited series or motion picture made for television

* Lady Gaga, “American Horror Story: Hotel”

Best performance by an actress in a television series, musical or comedy

* Rachel Bloom, “Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”